Leicester City Victory Parade

Leicester City are an unremarkable football team from the East Midlands who became one of the miracles of football history by winning the English Premiere League in 2016. On discovering Leicester would be honouring their home team by putting on a party that would bring the city to a standstill, Orlando booked a train ticket from London to capture the street scenes and document the fans.

Leicester

Football is a religion, and in the country that created football, this fairy tail David and Goliath story enraptured the nation. No football pundit or fan could have predicted that a team who have typically yo-yoed up and down between the top division and second division for over a century, would be crowned champions. Their achievement defied financial logic in an era of ever-increasing television revenue, where the most recent deal to broadcast matches on British TV was valued at 5.14bn, it was considered unthinkable that a team could challenge the dominance of the traditional elite club who have had a tight stranglehold on the Premiere league since it’s inception in 1992. For football fans across the country Leicester City FC’s modest finances and charming manager were a refreshing break, not to mention the exciting and creative football played by team of relative unknowns.

During the morning of the celebration day Leicester appeared slightly subdued with empty streets and shut up shops, but by the afternoon every corner on the parade path was packed. The football team with its Tia billionaire owner and entourage, snaked its way across the city on top of a bus whilst children watched in awe, seeing their heroes up close for the first time. The masses moved on to Victoria park to continue the celebrations until the sun dropped. Everyone and their grandma turned up, the subsequent images give an impression of the atmosphere and state of euphoria draped across the city. On this historic day, Leicester was truly unified amongst every class, race and creed. A reminder of how integral football is to English culture, and how everyone likes an excuse to have a party.

Orlando Gili was born in London in 1984 where he currently works as an editorial and commercial photographer. Predominately shooting portraiture, occasionally reportage, with an interest in documenting subcultures and eccentricity. He is a regular contributor for London journal Jocks & Nerds, and has been published in The Independent, Guardian and the Sunday Times.

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