INTERVIEW WITH… SASHA MASLOV

Sasha Maslov, photographer from Kharkiv (Ukraine) is living and working in New York. Sasha works with The New York Times, New York Magazine, Wall Street Journal Magazine. In Ukraine he worked with Esquire, Forbes, Billboard and Men’s Health. He created various projects like “The Veterans”, “Forgotten village”, “What is Burning Man” “Prison theater” wich have […]

Sasha Maslov, photographer from Kharkiv (Ukraine) is living and working in New York. Sasha works with The New York Times, New York Magazine, Wall Street Journal Magazine. In Ukraine he worked with Esquire, Forbes, Billboard and Men’s Health.

Sasha Maslov. Photo Courtesy of Sasha Maslov
Sasha Maslov. Photo Courtesy of Sasha Maslov

He created various projects like “The Veterans”, “Forgotten village”, “What is Burning Man” “Prison theater” wich have been exhibited in different photo galleries around Europe and United States.

 

Paul Oakenfold. Photo: Sasha Maslov
Paul Oakenfold.
Photo: Sasha Maslov

When did you start to think about photography?
Hard to say now. I’ve been taking pictures since I was a little kid. My first camera was a gift from my dad, who is also a photographer. It was a little half-frame piece of shit camera called Agat 18K – it would take over 70 frames per roll and I’d take pictures of everything. Still have the film.

What does photography mean to you and which kind of photography do you like more?
Photography is my life now. I mean, it’s almost everything I do. When I started shooting more or less meaningful things first projects were documentary, then shifted towards portraiture. Now it’s mostly portraits.

Paul Haggis. Photo: Sasha Maslov
Paul Haggis. Photo: Sasha Maslov

When you take a portrait, what is important for you?
Have enough face time with a person before I start shooting.

Do you think it’s important to follow a school to learn how to shoot?
No.

Tom Ford. Photo: Sasha Maslov
Tom Ford. Photo: Sasha Maslov

What’s the photo you want to take and you never did? What’s your photo-mission?
It’s always pictures you missed. I felt i especially when I was working in documentary photography. When you saw something and for whatever reason couldn’t take the shot. Can’t explain the feeling, I remember those “shots” more than anything.

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